go to future reading list

2024

  • Urban Bikeway Design Guide - NACTO, ISBN13 ???) READING 49/242
  • That Hideous Strength - C. S. Lewis (book, ISBN13 ???) READING
    • “You want a man who loves business and wire-pulling for their own sake and doesn’t really ask what it’s all about. If he did, he’d start bringing his own–well, I suppose he’d call them ‘ideas.’” (pp. 40)
  • Coders at Work - Peter Seibel (book, ISBN13 9781430219484) READING 248/???
    • NOTE: Begin interview with Jamie Zawinski
    • NOTE: Jamie Zawinski and his friend Dan Zigmond got jobs in a Carnegie Mellon lab when they were 15 because they went to an Apple Users Group!
    • “Because everyone was so sure that they were right, we fought constantly but it allowed us to communicate fast. Someone would lean over your cubicle and say, ‘What the fuck did you check in; that’s complete bullshit–you can’t do it that way. You’re an idiot.’ And you’d say, ‘Fuck off!’ and go look at it and fix it and check it in. We were very abrasive but we communicated fast because you didn’t have to go blow sunshine up someone’s ass and explain to them what you thought was wrong…” (pp. 16)
    • Second-system syndrome
    • “If you want it to really be cross-platform, you have to do them simultaneously. The porting thing results in a crappy product on the second platform.” (pp. 20)
    • “I think one of the most important things, for me anyway, when building something from the ground up like that is, as quickly as possible, getting the program to a state that you, the programmer, can use it. Even a little bit. Because that tells you where to go next in a really visceral way.” (pp. 29)
    • “You’ve got to say in a comment something that’s not there already. What’s it for? Either a higher-level or lower-level description, depending on what’s important.” (pp. 36)
    • “Long variable names. I’m not a fan of Hungarian notation, but I think using actual english words to describe things, except for loop iterators, where it’s obvious. Just as much verbosity as possible, I guess.” (pp. 36)
    • “…I think you want to arrange for there to be no more than three or four people working really closely together on a day-to-day basis.” (pp. 37)
    • “Well, I certainly picked up a bunch of computer science over the years. But learning to program was the goal. Making the machine do something was the goal and the computer-science side of it was a means to an end.” (pp. 41)
    • “It’s weird that people often confuse these two pursuits. People who are into very theoretical computer science are thought of in this same way as people who are shipping desktop applications. And they don’t really have a lot to do with each other.” (pp. 42)
    • “I think a lot of introductory stuff focuses on syntax and I definitely saw that in the classes I had in high school and in the intro classes at Carnegie-Mellon during my brief time there. This is not teaching people to program; this is teaching people where the semicolon goes. That seems like the kind of thing that’s going to scare people away from it more than anything, because that’s not the interesting part. Not even to someone who knows what they’re doing.” (pp. 43)
    • NOTE: Zawinksi hated the Design Patterns book because he felt it involved too much copy-pasting and calling basic things by complicated names.
    • NOTE: Zawinski’s only math exposure was algebra, physics, and a little calculus in high school. He said it wasn’t his thing.
    • Six Apart
    • GNU Debugger (GDB)
    • Class invariant
    • “Fitzpatrick: You don’t need that much math. For most programmers, day to day, statistics is a lot more important. If you’re doing graphics stuff, math is a lot more important but most people doing Java enterprise stuff or web stuff, it’s not. Logic helps and statistics comes up a lot.” (pp. 81)
    • “Seibel: A lot of being a modern programmer requires finding the right pieces that you need to use and understanding them just well enough to use them.” (pp. 84)
    • “Crockford:…Readability of code is now my first priority. It’s more important than being fast, almost as important as being correct, but I think being readable is actually the most likely way of making it correct.” (pp. 107)
    • Literate programming
    • “Crockford: I’ve become a really big fan of soft objects. In JavaScript, any object is what you say it is. That’s alarming to people who come at it from a classical perspective because without a class, then what have you got? It turns out you just have what you need, and that’s really useful. Adapting your objects…the objects that you want is much more straightforward.” (pp. 118)
    • JSLint
    • “Crockford:…Looking at where we’ve come on the timeline of programming, we started with machine codes and then we took a leap to symbolic assembly language and then we took a leap to high-level languages and then we took a leap to structured programming and then we took a leap to object-oriented programming. And each of these leaps takes about a human generation. We’re overdue on the next one.” (pp. 128)
    • “Crockford:…Right now, the network does an extremely poor job of identity, does an extremely poor job of security, and those are a necessary component, I think, of building robust social systems.” (pp. 131)
    • “Eich: I know a lot of JavaScript programmers who are clever programmers, and the best ones have a good grasp of the economics. They benchmark and they test as they go and they write tight JavaScript. They don’t have to know about how it maps to machine instructions.” (pp. 140?)
    • “Eich: So a blue-collar language like Java shouldn’t have a crazy generic system because blue-collar people can’t figure out what the hell the syntax means with covariant, contravariant type constraints.” (pp. 147)
    • “Eich:…Peter Norvig, when he was at Harlequin, he did this paper about how design patterns are really just flaws in your programming language. Get a better programming language.” (pp. 155)
    • “Eich:…We aren’t going to impose any kind of waterfall, design then implementation. That was the big thing when I was getting into the industry in the early 80’s and it was a nightmare, frankly. You spend all this time writing documents and then you go to write the code and often you realize that it’s really stupid and you totally change the code and put the documents down the memory hole.” (pp. 157-158)
    • Histrionics
    • “Prolog is so different to all the other programming languages. It’s just this amazing way of thinking. And it’s not appropriate to all problems. But it is appropriate to an extremely large set of problems. It’s not widely used. And it’s a great shame because programs are incredibly short. I think I went into shock when I wrote my first Prolog program. It’s a kind of shocking experience. You just walk around going, where’s the program–I haven’t written a program. You just told it a few facts about the system, about your problem.” (pp. 233)
      • NOTE: Joe Armstrong on Prolog
    • Hoare property
    • “…to be an entrepreneur you need to get energy from stressful situations involving money, whereas my energy is sapped by stressful situations involving money.” (pp. 248)
    • The Computer Scientist as Toolsmith by Fred Brooks
    • “…unless some people are working on radical and elegant things you’re going to end up in a local optimum, incrementally optimizing the mainstream but stuck on a low hill.” (pp. 251)
    • “One thing that is hard, even for professional software engineers and developers, is to viscerally grok the size of the artifacts on which we work. You’re looking at the Empire State Building through a 1-foot-square porthole, so it’s difficult to have a real feel for how gigantic the structure you’re looking at is. And how it’s interconnected.” (pp. 280)
      • NOTE: from Simon Peyton Jones interview
    • “I think the primary limitation on software is not the speed of computers, but our ability to get our heads around what it’s supposed to do.” (pp. 281)
      • NOTE: from Simon Peyton Jones interview
    • “Systems are filled with so much goop–in order to build an ASP.NET web service-y thing you need to know about this API and this tool and you need to write in three different languages and you need to know about Silverlight and LINQ and you can go on doing acronyms forever. And each of them has a fat book that describes it. This is a tension I don’t know how to resolve. These are useful systems–they’re not designed by accident. Each of them is there for a reason and each of them has a smart person who’s thinking hard about how this thing should be architected. But nevertheless, each, individually, has a broad interface. It may or may not be deep, but it’s certainly broad. There’s a lot of stuff you need to just have in your head. It’s like learning a language–a human language–there’s a large vocabulary.” (pp. 282)
  • I Renovated an apartment w/ FB marketplace ‘free stuff’ - Paranda (video)
  • Lynchburg Planning Commission 2-14-2024 - Lynchburg Virginia (video)
  • Virginia just passed a law that removes a barrier to building more housing - David McAuley (article)
  • Hinkle: Are proffers built on shaky ground? - A. Barton Hinkle (article) RECOMMENDED
    • “In theory, proffers are voluntary. In practice they’re about as voluntary as the money you fork over to a tow-truck company to get your car out of the impound lot. Localities don’t always require them. But when they do, developers cough up. Moreover: The localities, not the developers, decide how much the developers should pay. In Chesterfield the maximum proffer amount is $18,966. In Northern Virginia the sum can be twice that or more.”
    • Koontz v. St. John River Water Management District
  • Pierce Street Gateway celebrates successes, sets ambitious goals for 2024 - Rachael Smith (article) RECOMMENDED
  • Improving The Northeast Corridor and Acela Into World Class High Speed Rail - Lucid Stew (video)
  • Why induced demand is fake - Ben Southwood (article)
    • NOTE: Fatal flaws are that he doesn’t consider the cost of roads and thinks more transportation/mobility is always better.
  • Senate committee advances shared solar bills - Matt Busse (article)
  • United Daughters of the Confederacy’s tax breaks are on the chopping block. It’s about time. - Samantha Willis (article)
    • HB 568
    • SB 517
    • NOTE: Incredibly weird that the Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy is hardcoded into state law
  • Shared solar bills clear House panel - Matt Busse (article)
    • NOTE: Still need to work out how transmission is paid for if you subscribe to shared solar generation. Do the shared solar companies pass part of customer fee through to APCO for transmission? Would I still have a relationship with APCO? Would APCO mediate between me and shared solar company or would I exclusively interact with shared solar company?
    • House Bill 108
  • 4 Ways a City Can Hide Its Insolvency Using Accounting - Michael Durand-Wood (article) RECOMMENDED
    • “…while municipalities aren’t allowed to take on debt in their operating budgets, they are allowed use debt for their capital budgets.”
    • “So, simply by outsourcing roadwork, the City had turned a sizable portion of its operating expenses into capital expenses. The end result was the same, a newly maintained road, but now you could fund the expenses that used to be operations, with debt.”
      • NOTE: Not sure if Lynchburg does it this way. I think they have road maintenance as an operating expense.
  • The Best Argument for Parking Mandates (Is Still Wrong) - Daniel Herriges (article)
    • REFERRAL: RSS Subscription
    • NOTE: Decent introduction for the uninitiated
  • Gin, Television, and Social Surplus, or, “Looking for the Mouse” - Clay Shirky (article)
    • REFERRAL: Hacker News
    • NOTE: Hacker news commenters were pretty skeptical of his history in this article and thought Shirky was too optimistic about people’s desire to share. They said interactive attention sinks like Tiktok sort of derailed the productive sharing Shirky was excited about.
    • Clay Shirky
      • “In April 2010, Kevin Kelly cited the phrase ‘Institutions will try to preserve the problem to which they are the solution’, and called it the ‘Shirky Principle’”
  • Waste milk from Westover Dairy leaks into Lynchburg creek - Justin Faulconer (article)
    • NOTE: Article says Hendricks Street, but that doesn’t exist. It’s Hendricks Avenue.
  • The Family of Faith: Romans 4:16-17 - Bryan Rigg (sermon)
    • REFERRAL: Church attendance
    • “That is why it depends on faith, in order that the promise may rest on grace and be guaranteed to all his offspring–not only to the adherent of the law, but also to the one who shares the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all, as it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations”–in the presence of the God in whom he believed, who gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist.”
      • NOTE: ESV passage used in sermon
    • NOTE: NASB translation not used in sermon - “For this reason it is by faith, in order that it may be in accordance with grace, so that the promise will be guaranteed to all the descendants, not only to those who are of the Law, but also to those who are of the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all, (as it is written ‘A FATHER OF MANY NATIONS HAVE I MADE YOU’) in the presence of Him whom he believed, even God, who gives life to the dead and calls into being that which does not exist.”
      • NOTE: I wonder how the italic sections get put in…is there some type of emphasis in the original language?
    • NOTE: Sermon notes are really scattered because I’m zoning out today
    • “It depends upon faith so that the promise may be guaranteed to all the offspring of Abraham”
    • NOTE: The gentile nations do not have the law, sacraments, etc, so how will they be justified? It’s because they are saved not by adherence to the law but through faith.
    • NOTE: Referenced related passage Hebrews 11:17
    • “It is not about our faith but it is about the object of our faith”
  • What are analog bulletin boards used for today? Analysing media uses, intermediality and technology affordances in Swedish bulletin board messages using a citizen science approach - Christopher Kullenberg, Frauke Rohden, Anders Björkvall, Fredrik Brounéus, Anders Avellan-Hultman, Johan Järlehed, Sara Van Meerbergen, Andreas Nord, Helle Lykke Nielsen, Tove Rosendal, Lotta Tomasson, Gustav Westberg (research paper)
    • REFERRAL: No Tech Magazine
    • “Perhaps, rather paradoxically, part of the explanation to why the bulletin board has survived in the digital era of the internet lies in its immobility. Because of the constant global access to and character of social media, but also due to the mobility of the devices through which they are accessed, texts and messages posted on, for instance Facebook, can never be as local as those posted on a physical bulletin board.”
  • A Fence and a Ladder: Subversive Acts of Everyday Urbanism at Home - Stephanie Davidson (research paper)
    • “It is an example of what Margaret Crawford would call ‘everyday urbanism’¹ or what Barbara Kirschenblatt-Gimblett would call the ‘urban vernacular’: ‘The vernacular is what ordinary people do in their everyday lives. It consists of local practices that take shape outside planning, design, zoning, regulation, and covenants, if not in spite of them. The relationship between the built environment and the social practices that occur within it reveal both intentional and unintentional effects of great importance.’”
  • New River Valley gets a look at Amtrak options - Mark D. Robertson (article)
    • “If one of the plans goes ahead, Amtrak service could begin in the region as soon as 2028. The New River Valley has not had passenger rail service since 1979.”
    • “The Virginia Rail Passenger Authority is expected to vote at its June meeting on which plan to adopt. The rising cost of the New River Valley project, driven primarily by the cost of renovating the Merrimac Tunnel, has raised concerns among some state legislators that the proposed extension to Bristol might be in jeopardy. At last week’s authority meeting, board member Beth Rhinehart of Bristol repeatedly urged the authority not to adopt any station site in the New River Valley that would preclude an extension further west.”
    • NOTE: “Just another tool in the toolbox” is such obnoxious public agency corpo cliche
  • A Virginia Church Plans to Convert Parking into Housing - Barry Greene, Jr. (article)
  • Most Public Engagement is Worthless - Charles Marohn (article) RECOMMENDED
    • REFERRAL: Where Do Infrastructure Projects Come From? - Charles Marohn (article)
    • “Our thinking is a byproduct of the questions we ask. This is one of the reasons Steve Jobs was not a big fan of asking the customers what they wanted. Customers don’t know what they want, at least when it comes to something innovative. Something different.”
    • “The meeting started out with the standard public policy questions planning professionals like to ask. What do you like about the city? What do you not like? If you could change one thing, what would it be? The answers were worse than worthless, and it was painful to watch non-policy people trying to answer questions that weren’t designed for them. After a bit of pain, we got around to asking the kind of questions Steve Jobs would have asked. How did you get here today? (A: Walk or bike.) Is this how you get around in the winter when it’s twenty below zero? (A: Yes.) Do you feel safe walking? (A: No.) Do you feel safe biking? (A: No.)”
    • “Modern Planner: What percentage of the city budget should we spend on parks? Steve Jobs: Do you use the park?”
    • NOTE: One commenter called this approach “Design Thinking”
    • “Our planning efforts should absolutely be guided by the experiences of real people. But their actions are the data we should be collecting, not their stated preferences.”
    • “I’ve come to the point in my life where I think municipal comprehensive planning is worthless. More often than not, it is a mechanism to wrap a veneer of legitimacy around the large policy objectives of influential people. Most cities would be better off putting together a good vision statement and a set of guiding principles for making decisions, then getting on with it.”
    • “Focus groups are good for getting you to local minima, but suck for getting to the global minima. Which is probably far less useful than what Jobs said, but it works better for my brain.”
      • NOTE: From comment on article
    • NOTE: A commenter mentioned CAVE (citizens against virtually everything)
  • Where Do Infrastructure Projects Come From? - Charles Marohn (article)
    • REFERRAL: RSS subscription
  • Cleaning up the built environment to reduce crime - John Macdonald (article)
    • REFERRAL: RSS subscription
    • NOTE: Mentions really interesting studies and quotes, but is sort of wonkily written. Wonder if the author used a little too much LLM.”
  • Amtrak Celebrates Completion of New Baltimore Platform Construction - Amtrak (press release)
    • REFERRAL: RSS subscription
  • Stew’s Feb 2024 U.S. High Speed Rail News – CAHSR Brightline West Acela NEC Dallas Ft Worth Cascadia - Lucid Stew (video)
    • REFERRAL: Video subscription
  • Go 101 - Tapir Liu (book, v1.21.0-745652d) ABANDONED
    • “…I think the fact that, as a static language, Go is flexible as many dynamic script languages is the main selling point of Go language. Memory saving, fast program warming-up, fast code execution speed and fast compilations combined is another main selling point of Go. Although this is a common selling point of many C family languages. But for web development area, seldom languages own the four characteristics at the same time. In fact, this is the main reason why I switched to Go from Java for web development.” (pp. 4-5)
  • The Promise: Romans 4:13-15 - Bryan Rigg (sermon)
    • REFERRAL: Church attendance
    • NOTE: Three promises to Abraham are descendants, that his offspring will be a blessing to all people, and land.
    • NOTE: References Genesis 17:4
    • NOTE: Commentator Murray says promises to Abraham ultimately find their fulfillment in the new heavens and the new earth.
    • NOTE: We are promised to be a blessing to all people but it appears that we are antagonizing to all people.
    • NOTE: In Galatians we learn that Jesus is the [singular] heir of the promise to Abraham RE offspring.
    • NOTE: If we are heirs by obedience to the law, we will be brought more and more under condemnation. The law is good, but we are deficient in our ability to obey it.
  • Amtrak railway in New River Valley Delayed to 2028 - Thomas Mundy (article)
  • Amtrak Virginia Sets Record with Calendar Year 2023 Ridership - VPRA (press release)
    • NOTE: Route 46 to Roanoke saw 23.5% 2022 to 2023 ridership increase
  • Why strive? Stephen Fry reads Nick Cave’s letter on the threat of computed creativity - Nick Cave, Stephen Fry (open letter) RECOMMENDED
  • Hill City Happenings January 2024 - Lynchburg Virginia (video)
  • The American Government’s Massive Plan to Build more Passenger Rail: Corridor ID - Alan Fisher (video)
  • How to Build a Low-tech Internet - Kris De Decker (article)
    • “Although the WiFi-standard was developed for short-distance data communication (with a typical range of about 30 metres), its reach can be extended through modifications of the Media Access Control (MAC) layer in the networking protocol, and through the use of range extender amplifiers and directional antennas.”
    • RuralCafe
  • Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth - Apostrophe S Productions, Inc. (television series)
    • REFERRAL: Library browsing
    • Oblique
    • “Interviewer: What does it mean to have a sacred place? Joseph Campbell: This is a term I like to use now as an absolute necessity for anybody today. YOu must have a room, or a certain hour a day or so where you do not know what was in the newspapers that morning, you don’t know who your friends are, you don’t know what you owe to anybody, you don’t know what anybody owes to you, but a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be. This is the sacred place of creative incubation, and first you may find that nothing’s happening there, but if you have a sacred place and use it and take advantage of it, something will happen. Interviewer: This place does for you what the plains did for the hunter…? Joseph Campbell: For them the whole thing was a sacred place, you see, but most of our action is economically or socially determined and does not come out of our life. I don’t know if you’ve had the experience I’ve had, but as you get older the claims of the environment upon you are so great that you hardly know where the hell you are. What is it you intended? You’re always doing something that is required of you this minute…that minute…another minute. Where is your bliss station?”
    • NOTE: He describes sanskrit as being the great spiritual language of the world
    • Rota Fortunae
    • NOTE: When interviewer asks him how one can keep ahold of one’s bliss and not lose the plot, Campbell refers to one’s bliss as one’s umbilical! If we are born of God, He is our bliss and our umbilical cord providing life to us.
    • “When Peter drew his sword and cut off the…uh…the servant’s ear there in Gethsemane and Jesus said ‘put up your sword, Peter’ and put the ear back on…Peter has been drawing his sword ever since!”
    • NOTE: Abelard in 12th century wrote about Christ’s death as atonement and not as a payment.
    • “When you have a goddess as the creator, it’s her own very body that is the universe. She is identical with the universe, and in Egypt you have the mother heavens: Nuut…the goddess Nuut, who’s represented as the whole heavenly sphere”
      • NOTE: Definitely misspelled Nuut
    • “These fighting people are herding people. The Semites are herders of sheep and goats, and the Indo-Europeans of cattle.”
    • NOTE: He refers to health, wealth, progeny and fun as the animal aims
  • OPINION: Could Pedestrian Reflectors Reduce Fatal Crashes in the United States? - Matt Kalinowski (article)
  • The Computer Scientist as Toolsmith II - Frederick P. Brooks (article)
    • “A folk adage of the academic profession says, ‘Anything which has to call itself a science isn’t.’ By this criterion, physics, chemistry, geology, and astronomy may be sciences; political science, military science, social science, and computer science are not.” (pp. 2)
    • “Have we abandoned art as subcreation for each other’s enrichment, in favor of an art of self-exorcism, art as primal scream?”
    • NOTE: He jumps between topics somewhat schizophrenically…I wonder if the original “Computer Scientist as Toolsmith” that Coders at Work mentioned was significantly different? There’s a reference in this work to the original one, which was published in Information Processing 77.
  • The Surprising Success of Private Passenger Rail - Wendover Productions (video)
  • Bills would bring shared solar to Appalachian Power territory, expand program for Dominion customers - Matt Busse (article)
    • REFERRAL: Blog subscription
    • NOTE: Seems to be a completely alternative way to purchase power. There was a bit in the article about how the rates shared solar consumers pay for power is subsidized by the non-shared-solar ratepayers who pay a specific rate for generation and distribution. Apparently the rates at which these shared solar operators sell power is not regulated by the VA SCC (at least not with the same tariff as APCO or Dominion).
  • Alexandria is exploring e-bike incentives. Could a statewide program be next? - Wyatt Gordon (article)
    • REFERRAL: Blog subscription
    • “Since Virginia’s e-bike bill is currently being drafted by the General Assembly’s Division of Legislative Services, no one yet knows exactly what the legislation carried by Del. Thomas will entail. The bill could lay out a statewide rebate, propose a pilot program or simply study how best the commonwealth could implement e-bike incentives.”
  • Bad data: Not a decline in travel - Joe Cortright (article)
    • “The critical takeaway for any user of this NHTS data has to be that it you simply can’t compare the 2017 trip-making data with the 2022 trip making data. This shouldn’t be an obscure footnote: it should be a cigarette-pack warning. But, with its cute-infographic, the USDOT did exactly the opposite.”
  • Why Red States Are Suing to Hide Their Transportation Emissions - Kea Wilson (article)
    • REFERRAL: Blog subscription
    • NOTE: Virginia is among the states that sued the president, DOT secretary, federal highway administrator, and USDOT
    • Sunshine law
    • “‘There’s this idea that as people drive more, it’s good for the economy, but that is a very questionable hypothesis,’ she added. “When people drive more, it costs people a lot of money — money that could be used on more wealth building enterprises like education or home ownership or retirement. … We’re disinvesting in rural communities and making rural households travel further for jobs and basic necessities. We should be looking for efficiencies that get people where they need to go with less travel and less cost.’”
  • Narrower City Streets Could Actually Be Safer: Study - Nico Demattia (article)
    • “So what do the researchers recommend changing? For starters, switching the standard road width to 10 feet for roads with speed limits under 35 mph that aren’t used as freight corridors.”
  • Effective Transportation in Smaller Cities and Rural Areas - John Salmon (article)
    • REFERRAL: Blog subscription
    • NOTE: Had an epiphany that regardless of what John thinks about fixed-route transit, his nonprofit taxi system would be an excellent complement to a strong, core network of fixed bus routes with <=15 minute headways. I’m interested in solving landuse issues and un-sprawling the city through the provision of excellent fixed route transit, and he’s just trying to help less fortunate people get where they’re going under a sucky landuse regime. We’re working on different problems.
  • The Bialetti Moka Express (Episode #1) - James Hoffman (video)
    • REFERRAL: YouTube search
  • 10 Resolutions for a Very Bicycle New Year - Ron Johnson (article)
  • Your Eco-Friendly Lifestyle Is a Big Lie - Matt Reynolds (article) NOT RECOMMENDED
    • NOTE: Very fluffy
  • Statement regarding the ongoing SourceHut outage - Drew DeVault (article)
  • Resources for Reformers: Houston’s minimum lot sizes - Salim Furth (article) RECOMMENDED
    • REFERRAL: Blog subscription
    • “In theory, lowering lot size mandates ought to raise the price of land while lowering the price of existing structures.”
  • Member One Federal Credit Union and Virginia Credit Union to merge - Matt Busse
  • Mexico City: Casa de Carla y Pedro (television episode) RECOMMENDED
    • REFERRAL: Claira W.
    • NOTE: They set up a privately-operated public library in their home that’s full of specialist books not found in other libraries. To check out a book, people have their picture taken with them holding the book.
  • France: Hourré House - Katy Chevigny (television episode)
    • REFERRAL: Claira W.
  • Sweden: Naturhus - Doug Pray (television episode)
    • REFERRAL: Claira W.
  • Making a Home vs Finding a Home - Isaac Morehouse (article)
  • The Procrastination Matrix - Tim Urban (article) RECOMMENDED
    • “In other words, Quadrant 1 often does not exist. This isn’t always the case, but it’s especially likely to be true for people who have yet to get their career rolling, because usually when your truly important work is also urgent, it means you have something good going on. This creates a catch-22, where the people who most need urgency in order to do things—procrastinators early in their career—are often those with a totally vacant Quadrant 1.”
  • How to Beat Procrastination - Tim Urban (article)
  • Why Procrastinators Procrastinate - Tim Urban (article)
  • Surprising And Fascinating Results From The Taste Test - James Hoffman (video)

2023

2022

2021

Future

  • Deschooling Society - Ivan Illich
  • Divine Sex - Jonathan Grant
    • REFERRAL: Audrey F.
  • The Dark Forest - Cixin Liu LPL
  • The Overworked American: The Unexpected Decline of Leisure - Juliet Schor
  • Raising America: Experts, Parents, and a Century of Advice About Children - Ann Hulbert
  • Richard Sapper - Jonathan Olivares
  • The Space Trilogy - C.S. Lewis LPL
  • The Fountainhead - Ayn Rand LPL
  • The Decline of the West - Oswald Spengler
  • The Closing of the American Mind - Allan Bloom LPL
  • Anxious Parents: A History of Modern Childrearing in America - Peter N. Stearns
  • Lex, Rex - Samuel Rutherford
    • Rich B.
  • How Will You Measure Your Life - Clayton Christensen LPL
    • Hannah Frankman
  • Assimilate : a critical history of industrial music - S. Alexander Reed
  • The Underground History of American Education - John Taylor Gatto LPL
  • Till We Have Faces - C.S. Lewis LPL
  • The ARPANET Sourcebook: The Unpublished Foundations of the Internet - Peter H. Salus
  • The Cathedral and the Bazaar - Eric S. Raymond
  • How to Read a Book - Mortimer J. Adler
  • Working in Public: The Making and Maintenance of Open Source Software - Nadia Eghbal
  • Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids - Bryan Caplan
  • Free as in Freedom: Richard Stallman’s Crusade for Free Software - Sam Williams
  • Fault Lines: The Social Justice Movement and Evangelicalism’s Looming Catastrophe - Voddie T. Baucham Jr.
    • REFERRAL: LaShonda D.
  • Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder - Nassim Nicholas Taleb LPL
  • The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money - John Maynard Keynes
  • The Book of Laughter and Forgetting - Milan Kundera
    • REFERRAL: Live Not By Lies - Rod Dreher (book)
  • The Demon in Democracy: Totalitarian Temptations in Free Societies - Ryszard Legutko
    • REFERRAL: Live Not By Lies - Rod Dreher (book)
  • The Last Man in Russia: The Struggle to Save a Dying Nation - Oliver Bullough
    • REFERRAL: Live Not By Lies - Rod Dreher (book)
  • This saved us : how to survive brainwashing - Silvester Krčméry
    • REFERRAL: Live Not By Lies - Rod Dreher (book)
  • An Introduction to GCC: For the GNU Compilers GCC and G++ - Brian J. Gough
  • Operating Systems: Three Easy Pieces - Remzi H Arpaci-Dusseau
  • The Elements of Computing Systems: Building a Modern Computer from First Principles - Noam Nisan and Shimon Schocken
  • Nutrition and Metabolism - Susan Lanham-New, Ian Macdonald, Helen M. Roche and Nutrition Society
  • x86-64 Assemby Language Programming with Ubuntu - Ed Jorgensen
  • Computer Systems: A Programmer’s Perspective (2nd Edition) - Randall E. Bryant and David R. O’Hallaron
  • Beej’s Guide to Network Programming Using Internet Sockets - Brian “Beej Jorgensen” Hall
  • High Performance Browser Networking - Ilya Grigorik
  • Copper, Iron, and Clay - Sarah Dahmen
    • REFERRAL: Daniel K.
  • Mastering OpenSCAD - Jochen Kerdels
  • TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1 (The Protocols) - W. Richard Stevens (saved somewhere in reading folder)
  • The Name of the Wind - Patrick Rothfuss LPL
  • The New Jim Crow - Michelle Alexander LPL
  • The 480 - Eugene Burdick
  • Anarchy in Action - Colin Ward
  • Thinking in Systems: A Primer - Donella H. Meadows
  • The Long Night of the Watchman - Václav Benda
  • The Heavenly Man - Brother Yun
  • Lynchburg, VA Downtown 2040 Master Plan
  • DNS and BIND - Cricket Liu, Paul Albitz
  • East of Eden - Jonathan EdwardS
    • REFERRAL: David W.
  • Reformed Worship - Howard L. Rice
  • The Tale of Two Adams - Chris Caughey
    • REFERRAL: Austin O.
  • Human Transit - Jarrett Walker
  • Symbolic Exchange and Death - Jean Baudrillard
    • REFERRAL: Cody Wilson
  • Cool Tools: A Catalog of Possibilities - Kevin Kelly LPL
  • You and Heredity - Amram Scheinfeld
  • The Box - Mark Levinson
  • I led 3 lives - Herbert A. Philbrick
    • REFERRAL: Kurt F.
  • Edge City: Life on the New Frontier - Joel Garreau
  • The Bug - Ellen Ullman
  • Come and Take It: The Gun Printer’s Guide to Thinking Free - Cody Wilson
  • Lectures on Jung’s Typology - Marie-Louise von Franz
  • Programming in Scala, 5th Edition - Martin Odersky, Lex Spoon, Bill Venners, and Frank Sommers
  • Digital Vegan - Andy Farnell
  • The Tragedy of Great Power Politics - John Mearsheimer
  • Urban Bikeway Design Guide, Second Edition - National Association of City Transportation Officials
  • Design manual for bicycle traffic - Crow Platform
  • Central Banking 101 - Steven Wang
  • Levy’s Laws of the Disillusionment of the True Liberal - Marion J. Levy Jr.
  • Between the World and Me - Ta-Nehisi Coates
    • REFERRAL: Bryant M.
  • The Player of Games - Iain M. Banks
  • The Shadow of Christ in the Book of Job - C.J. Williams
    • REFERRAL: Pastor I met at Charlottesville Amtrak station
  • Thank God for Bitcoin: The Creation, Corruption and Redemption of Money - Gabe Higgins, Derek Waltchack, Robert Breedlove, J.M. Bush, Julia Tourianski, Lyle Pratt, and George Mekhail
  • The Bitcoin Standard - Saifedean Ammous
  • Layered Money - Nik Bhatia
  • The 48 Laws of Power - Robert Greene
  • Why things bite back - Edward Tenner
  • Christian Theology and Tragedy - Kevin Taylor & Giles Waller
  • John Acuff - Start
    • REFERRAL: Michael H.
  • 48 Days to the Work You Love - Dan Miller
    • REFERRAL: Michael H.
  • The Nordic Secret - Lene Rachel Andersen & Tomas Björkman
  • Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs - Harold Abelson, Gerald Jay Sussman, Julie Sussman
  • The Insolent Chariots - John C. Keats
  • Subject Collections - Lee Ash
    • REFERRAL: The Independent Scholar’s Handbook - Ronald Gross (book)
  • Encyclopedia of Associations - Frederick Gale Ruffner, Jr.
    • REFERRAL: The Independent Scholar’s Handbook - Ronald Gross (book)
  • How To Be Invisible - J.J. Luna
    • REFERRAL: The Watchman Privacy Podcast
  • Bowling Alone - Robert D. Putnam
  • Suburban Nation - Jeff Speck & Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk (book)
    • REFERRAL: Why Does Suburbia Suck? - David Pakman Show (video)
    • REFERRAL: A City is Not a Tree: 50th Anniversary Edition - Christopher Alexander (book, ISBN13 9780989346979)
  • The Existential Pleasures of Engineering - Samuel C. Florman
    • REFERRAL: The Independent Scholar’s Handbook - Ronald Gross (book)
  • Blaming Technology - Samuel C. Florman
    • REFERRAL: The Independent Scholar’s Handbook - Ronald Gross (book)
  • Hill City Trolleys - Harold E. Cox
    • REFERRAL: Christian Crouch
  • Amateurs: On the Margin Between Work and Leisure - Robert A. Stebbins
    • REFERRAL: The Independent Scholar’s Handbook - Ronald Gross (book)
  • A Pattern Language - Christopher Alexander (book)
    • REFERRAL: Isaac Morehouse
  • A New Theory of Urban Design - Christopher Alexander
    • REFERRAL: A City is Not a Tree: 50th Anniversary Edition - Christopher Alexander (book, ISBN13 9780989346979)
  • Physics - Aristotle
  • The Black Tax - Shawn D. Rochester
    • REFERRAL: Bryant M.
  • Pandora’s Seed - Spencer Wells (book)
  • Packaging: The Sixth Sense - Ernest Dichter (book)
    • REFERRAL: Cut Your Grocery Bills in Half - Barbara Salsbury (book)
  • Red Famine - Anne Applebaum (book)
    • REFERRAL: David W.
  • Why Do Rich People Love Quiet? - Xochitl Gonzalez (article)
    • REFERRAL: jwz.org
  • Strange Days - Kathryn Bigelow (film)
    • REFERRAL: Michael R.
  • The Northman - Robert Eggers (film)
  • God, Freedom, and Evil - Alvin Plantinga (book)
    • REFERRAL: Wikipedia article on the problem of evil
  • The Pirate Book - Aa.Vv. (book)
    • REFERRAL: notechmagazine.come
  • The War on the West - Douglas Murry (book)
    • REFERRAL: David W.
  • The Great Good Place - Ray Oldenburg
  • Current fear of crime, sense of community, and loneliness in italian adolescents: The role of autonomous mobility and play during childhood - Miretta Preza (paper)
  • Parking Management Best Practices - Todd Litman (book)
  • Fighting Traffic - Peter Norton REFERRAL: Episode 4: Cars and the Culture Wars - The War on Cars (podcast episode)
  • Retrofitting Suburbia - Ellen Jones (book)
    • REFERRAL:
  • Episode 11: WCAR Talk Radio - The War on Cars (podcast episode)
  • How to be an Atheist - Mitch Stokes (book)
    • REFERRAL: Daniel C.
  • The Power Broker - Robert A. Caro
    • REFERRAL: reddit.com/r/f***cars
  • The Streets of Lynchburg - Martha Helen Cleveland Craddock (book)
    • REFERRAL: Givens Books browsing
  • Building the American Highway System - Bruce Edsall Seely
  • Connect Central Virginia 2045 Long Range Transportation Plan
  • How To Start a Business without Any Money - Rachel Bridge (book)
    • REFERRAL: Hacker News
  • No Logo - Naomi Klein (book)
  • How to Do Nothing - Jenny Odell (book)
  • Four Thousand Weeks - Oliver Burkeman
    • REFERRAL: Hacker News
  • Parking Reform Made Easy - Richard Willson (book)
  • Reasonable Faith - William Lane Craig (book)
    • REFERRAL: Twitter
  • A Severe Mercy - Sheldon Vanauken (book)
    • REFERRAL: Tyler G.
  • The Highway and the City - Lewis Mumford (book)
    • REFERRAL: The High Cost of Free Parking - Donald Shoup (book, ISBN13 9781932364965)
  • The Geography of Nowhere - James Howard Kunstler (book)
    • REFERRAL: Active Towns East Coast Greenway video
  • Economism - Jack Quack (book)
    • REFERRAL: Bryant M.
  • Orthodoxy - G. K. Chesterton
    • REFERRAL: Strong Towns
    • NOTE: One chapter discusses mystic patriotism for one’s place…similar to topophilia.
  • The Wickerman - Robin Hardy (film)
  • Emergent Tokyo: Designing the spontaneous city - Jorge Almazan (book)
    • REFERRAL: Strong Towns Slack member kaz.wojtewicz
  • Against Heresies - Irenaeus (book)
    • REFERRAL: Daniel C.
  • The Secret Life of Groceries - Benjamin Lorr (book)
    • REFERRAL: Hacker News
  • Between Heaven and Earth - Sarah Ricardi-Swartz (book)
    • REFERRAL: The Temptation of Illiberalism in Theologically Conservative Christian Circles: An Initial Take - Brian J. Auten (speech transcript)
  • Haven in a Heartless World - Christopher Lasch (book)
  • The Affluent Society - John Kenneth Galbraith (book)
    • REFERRAL: The High Cost of Free Parking - Donald Shoup (book)
  • The Fourth Trimester (book)
    • REFERRAL: Daniel K.
  • Dominion - Tom Holland (book)
    • REFERRAL: Josh D.
  • An Autobiography - Booker T. Washington (book)
    • REFERRAL: Josh D.
  • Desert Solitaire - Edward Abbey (book)
    • REFERRAL: The War on Cars podcast - Infiltrating the Auto Show
    • NOTE: He writes about the effects of industrial tourism in the national parks and the way driving through parks rather than hiking seriously affects the visitor experience
  • The Design of Childhood - Alexandra Lange (book)
  • The Lives of a Cell - Lewis Thomas (book)
  • The Economy of Cities - Jane Jacobs (book)
  • Streetfight - Janette Sadik-Khan (book)
  • SaltFatAcidHeat - Samin Nosrat (book)
    • REFERRAL: Dona M.
  • Meet you at the cafe - ??? (book)
  • The Epistle to the Romans - John Murray (book)
    • REFERRAL: Steve H.
  • Beyond Greenways - Robert Searns (book)
  • The Past is a Future Country - Edward Dutton (book)
    • REFERRAL: Hacker News
  • Cities for People - Jan Gehl (book)
    • REFERRAL: Walkable City - Jeff Speck (book, ISBN13 9780865477728)
  • The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth - Benjamin Friedman (book)
    • REFERRAL: The Density Divide: Urbanization, Polarization, and Populist Backlash - Will Wilkinson (research paper)
    • NOTE: Quote from “The Density Divide” summarizing this book’s thesis:
      • “…the Harvard economist Benjamin Friedman draws on the relationship between business cycles and periods of social progress and retrenchment to offer a compelling argument that these psychological phenomena combine to create a powerful one-way ratchet effect.151 In the context of longstanding expectations of rising prosperity, a decrease in the rate of growth can seem like a painful loss, eliciting a propensity to jealously guard our holdings and advantages. We can become disposed to close the gates and bolt them, even if the economy, and each individual share, continues to grow. It follows, then, that actual economic stagnation or contraction will be even worse, and raise our competitive, zero-sum instincts from a simmer to a boil.”
  • The Fall of Public Man - Richard Sennett (book)
  • Affluent Workers Revisited - Fiona Devine (book)
  • Tactical Urbanism - Mike Lydon (book)
    • REFERRAL: Confessions of a Recovering Engineer - Charles Marohn (book, ISBN???)
  • City of Brass - S. A. Chakraborty (book)
    • REFERRAL: Daniel K.
  • Bottom of the Pot - Naz Deravian (book)
    • REFERRAL: Daniel K.
  • Fragile Neighborhoods - Seth Caplan (book)
  • Lynchburg and its People - W. Asbury Christian (book) LPL
    • REFERRAL: Browsing at Lynchburg Public Library
  • The Art of Building Cities - Camillo Sitte (book)
    • REFERRAL: Strong Towns Slack
  • You and Your Research - Richard Hamming (lecture transcript)
    • REFERRAL: Coders at Work - Peter Seibel (book, ISBN13 9781430219484)
  • A People’s History of the United States - ??? (book)
    • REFERRAL: Lady Bird (film)
  • The Myth of the Birth of the Hero - Otto Rank (book)
    • REFERRAL: Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth - Apostrophe S Productions, Inc. (television series)
  • How to Take Smart Notes - Sönke Ahrens (book)
    • REFERRAL: Hacker News thread
    • NOTE: A recommended book about Zettelkasten
  • Starting FORTH - Leo Brodie (book, ISBN10 0138429308)
    • REFERRAL: Web search
  • City Comforts - David Sucher (book)
  • The Technological Society - Jacques Ellul (book)
  • Switch - Chip Heath (book)
    • REFERRAL: Strong Towns Local Conversations Leader Course
  • The Righteous Mind - Jonathan Haidt (book)
    • REFERRAL: Strong Towns Local Conversations Leader Course

Assume that any quotations on this page are under copyright of the original author. They are copied here for the purpose of study and criticism, which constitutes fair use.